Posted by: David Harley | July 28, 2017

Long cigarettes, cheap red wine

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Posted by: David Harley | July 28, 2017

moonstruck [demo]

Words and Music by David Harley: all rights reserved

 

Posted by: David Harley | July 24, 2017

seesaw [very rough demo]

Posted by: David Harley | July 24, 2017

Sea Fret 2

Improved version.

 

Posted by: David Harley | July 24, 2017

Rainy Day Moments [demo]

Posted by: David Harley | July 9, 2017

Whistle While You Walk

Copyright David Harley April 2017: all rights reserved

Whistle While You Walk (Harley)

Sometimes – you look into her eyes
And all you want to do is talk
Sometimes you have to see her
Other times you just have to walk

Just walk away
Walk away
A shrug, a sigh
And whistle as you walk away

Sometimes you’re the heartbreak
Sometimes you’re just broke
And all your songs are lost
In the space between the notes

Just walk away
Walk away
A shrug, a sigh
And whistle as you walk away

Sometimes you know you love her
Sometimes you feel so cold
Sometimes your heart is empty
And you turn back to the road

Just walk away
Walk away
A shrug, a sigh
And whistle as you walk away

Sometimes – you look into her eyes
And all you want to do is talk
Sometimes you have to see her
Other times you just have to walk

Just walk away
Walk away
A shrug, a sigh
And whistle as you walk away

 

Posted by: David Harley | July 2, 2017

hannah 4

Posted by: David Harley | June 27, 2017

Dying of Communication

Posted by: David Harley | June 21, 2017

Big Road Blues

Posted by: David Harley | June 18, 2017

Epitaph on an army of mercenaries

Another Housman setting, this time from Last Poems. Very rough, since I was literally making up the tune as I went along, but I’m seeing whether it will fit into a sequence of songs I’ve been working on. (See Soldier (You Come, You Go) and Soldier of Fortune.)

The 1917 poem refers to the British Expeditionary Force, which German propagandists referred to as ‘mercenaries’ because at the outbreak of war, Britain’s army consisted of professional soldiers rather than conscripts or the later volunteers of ‘Kitchener’s Army‘. The BEF was practically wiped out by 1916.

A poem by Hugh MacDiarmid, ‘Another Epitaph on an Army of Mercenaries’ takes a very different view, regarding the BEF as ‘professional murderers’.

The setting by Geoffrey Burgon sung by Gillian McPherson on the soundtrack to the Dogs of War is much more dramatic, and very effective (even though some might doubt whether the poem is entirely appropriate in terms of this particular novel and movie). This is much simpler and fits the cycle I have in mind better. Still, I might rethink that. This is definitely a work in progress.

Here’s the Housman poem:

Epitaph on an Army of Mercenaries

These, in the day when heaven was falling,
The hour when earth’s foundations fled,
Followed their mercenary calling,
And took their wages, and are dead.

Their shoulders held the sky suspended;
They stood, and earth’s foundations stay;
What God abandoned, these defended,
And saved the sum of things for pay.

David Harley

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